Interaction Between the Technical and Political Processes in Solving Flooding Problems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah

by Lloyd H. Austin, Utah Div of Water Resources, Salt, Lake City, UT, USA,
J. Paul Riley, Utah Div of Water Resources, Salt, Lake City, UT, USA,
Paul C. Summers, Utah Div of Water Resources, Salt, Lake City, UT, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Water Forum '86: World Water Issues in Evolution

Abstract: The Great Salt Lake occupies the lowest point in a drainage basin of approximately 22,000 mi**2 (57000 km**2). Inflows to the lake occur as surface runoff, groundwater flows, and precipitation directly on the lake surface. Because it is a terminal water body, lake volumes are very sensitive to prevailing climatological conditions. During the past three years, precipitation amounts throughout the drainage basin and inflows to the lake have significantly exceeded normal values. The rising waters already have caused extensive damages to both public and private properties. This paper discusses the interaction between the technical and political groups in trying to deal with flooding around the Great Salt Lake.

Subject Headings: Lakes | Floods | Political factors | Salts | Salt water | Drainage basins | Inflow | Precipitation | Overland flow | Groundwater flow | Runoff | Utah | North America | United States

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