Designing Marinas to Mitigate Impacts

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by R. Craig Holland, Middleton & Associates, Seattle, WA, USA,

Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Ports '86

Abstract: The John Wayne Marina was permitted for construction only after certain design features were altered to accomodate major biological and water quality concerns. The moorage basin was relocated to avoid dense clam beds, and the basin size was reduced to decrease dredging and filling impacts on eelgrass and tidelands. A stream diversion was accomplished in a manner that enhanced its attractiveness to salmon spawning. The moorage basin's planform geometry was designed to increase uniform tidal flushing characteristics. Dredging quantities were reduced by terraced design depths within the basin, and dredging impacts on water quality were minimized by in-the-dry material removal and land disposal. The rock breakwater and protected shorelines were designed with sloping intertidal cross-sections to assist fingerling salmon migration to the sea.

Subject Headings: Water quality | Basins | Dredged materials | Water pollution | Mooring | Geometrics | Aquatic habitats |

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