Water and Wastewater, Time to Automate?

by Doloff F. Bishop, Branch Chf.; Water Engineering Research Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268,
Walter W. Schuk, Water Engineering Research Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1986, Vol. 56, Issue 1, Pg. 56-58


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Water and wastewater engineers have been slow to adopt a full circle systems approach to automated monitoring and control. Such a technical tactic for controlling water and wastewater distribution and collection would be more efficient and less costly. Automated control technology is applied to some degree for managing gross contaminants and flows in most process applications and in water collection and distribution systems. But engineers do not know enough about treatment process and in-stream dynamics of surface waters to use treatment plants most efficiently or to realize the full potential of automated control technology. This is particularly true for wastewater treatment. Some key online sensors have yet to be developed for monitoring and controlling disinfection, toxic discharges and sludge incineration.

Subject Headings: Automation | Control systems | Monitoring | Water management | Wastewater management

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