Survey of Airport Pavement Distress in Cold Regions

by Ted S. Vinson, Oregon State Univ, Civil Engineering, Dep, Corvallis, OR, USA,
Irene Zomerman, Oregon State Univ, Civil Engineering, Dep, Corvallis, OR, USA,
Richard Berg, Oregon State Univ, Civil Engineering, Dep, Corvallis, OR, USA,
Hisao Tomita, Oregon State Univ, Civil Engineering, Dep, Corvallis, OR, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Cold Regions Engineering

Abstract: The most common pavement problems were associated with non-traffic related phenomena and included pre-existing cracks reflecting through asphalt concrete overlay (in two years or less), thermal cracking, and longitudinal cracking (at a construction joint). Most of the airports experienced water pumping up through cracks and joints in the pavements during spring thaw, or additional roughness due to differential frost heave in the winter, or both problems. Many airport managers reported that debris was generated at cracks during the winter and spring. Several airports experienced problems with lighting in the winter and spring. Many pavement problems can be traced to the evolutionary history of general aviation airports and the lack of consideration for site drainage.

Subject Headings: Airport and airfield pavements | Cracking | Pavement condition | Pavement overlays | Winter | Asphalt pavements | Concrete pavements | Asphalt concrete

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