Failure of a Large Reinforced Concrete Pipeline

by William L. Gamble, Univ of Illinois at, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA,
Edward J. Cording, Univ of Illinois at, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA,
James W. Mahar, Univ of Illinois at, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Advances in Underground Pipeline Engineering

Abstract: This paper describes the damage that occurred when a landslide overloaded an 11 ft diameter reinforced concrete pipeline. The 8 ft lengths of pipe, each of 11. 5-in. wall thickness, were joined by flush bell and spigot joints containing O-ring gaskets. The pipe had been designed for internal water pressure and external loadings from the soil backfill, but no allowance had been made for loadings from the slopes existing at the site. The major damage consisted to extensive delaminated areas, where the inner cage of reinforcement pulled away from the body of the pipe in the crown and invert, and significant numbers of cracks in the bells and spigots.

Subject Headings: Concrete pipes | Water pressure | Reinforced concrete | Load factors | Damage (structural) | Overloads | Water pipelines

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