Water Supply Supplemented by Airport Storm Runoff

by Gordon L. Dugan, Univ of Hawaii at Manoa, Dep of, Civil Engineering, Honolulu, HI, USA,
Elizabeth Christakos-Comack, Univ of Hawaii at Manoa, Dep of, Civil Engineering, Honolulu, HI, USA,
L. Stephen Lau, Univ of Hawaii at Manoa, Dep of, Civil Engineering, Honolulu, HI, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Water for Resource Development

Abstract: The quality of natural and induced storm water runoff from Oahu's Honolulu International Airport (HIA) and four outer island airports in Hawaii was evaluated for water supply use. Two basic storm quality monitoring schemes were incorporated: the wet season and dry season. The analytical results for all the samples, especially those from the HIA, indicated mercury and turbidity concentrations that significantly exceeded the primary drinking water regulations, while concentrations of phenol and carbon chloroform extract definitely indicated that the concentrations of petroleum-derived products would be too high and expensive to remove for consideration as an alternate drinking water supply. However, if collected and stored, the water could serve as a source of subpotable water.

Subject Headings: Water supply | Stormwater management | Water storage | Water quality | Airports and airfields | Runoff | Water pollution | Air quality | Storms | North America | Hawaii | United States | Honolulu

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