Control of Adverse Wind Near Buildings

by Parvis Merati, Grad. Asst.; Armour Coll. of Engrg., Dept. of Mech. and Mechanical and Aerospace Engrg., Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, Ill. 60616,
Roald Wigeland, Asst. Prof.; Armour Coll. of Engrg., Dept. of Mech. and Mechanical and Aerospace Engrg., Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, Ill. 60616,
Hassan Nagib, (M.ASCE), Prof.; Armour Coll. of Engrg., Dept. of Mech. and Mechanical and Aerospace Engrg., Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, Ill. 60616,


Serial Information: Transportation Engineering Journal of ASCE, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 5, Pg. 509-521


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: The characteristics of basic flow modules associated with an isolated building, a fence and building combination, and a building with various canopies in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer are documented. The rolled-up horseshoe-shaped vortex at the windward base of the building, the shear layer originating at the leading edges of the roof and sides of the building, the stagnation region on the face of the building, and the tornado-like vortices in the recirculating region in the lee of the building are several of the flow modules that exist around an isolated building. The installation of a porous fence in open areas produces effective protection for pedestrians, while its presence in front of the building worsens the condition there. The fence solidity does not have any appreciable effects on the flow field. The presence of a canopy generally improves the severe conditions existing near the ground in front of a single building. The best position for attaching the canopy is at one-quarter height of the building.

Subject Headings: Fences | Canopies | Boundary layers | Flow simulation | Vortices | Base isolation | Base flow | Base course

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