Shore Line Effects on Mixing of a Tee Diffuser

by E. Eric Adams, (M.ASCE), Lect., Principal Research Engr.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, Mass.,
William C. Skamarock, Undergraduate Student; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, Mass.,
Rita U. Nothaft, Undergraduate Student; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, Mass.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Hydraulics Division, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 10, Pg. 1232-1238


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Submerged multi-port diffusers are often used to discharge waste heat resulting from once-through cooling at coastal power plants. For shallow receiving waters characterized by weak ambient currents (e.g., large lakes), a tee diffuser, with diffuser axis parallel to shore and ports oriented offshore, provides the most effective mixing. However, if the diffuser is sufficiently close to shore, dilution is reduced because of the limited availability of ambient dilution water reaching ports from behind the diffuser. A semi-empirical theory, with laboratory calibration, accounts for the reduced dilution for a tee diffuser in shallow, quiescent water of constant depth near a parallel shoreline. Dilution is reduced by 10% when the ratio of distance offshore to diffuser length is about 0.8 while dilution drops by 30% when the raio is about 0.35. For a sloping bottom, similar results are expected if the distance offshore is taken as one-half of the actual distance.

Subject Headings: Diffusion | Dilution | Shores | Power plants | Shallow water | Ports and harbors | Submerging

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