CaCO3 Neutralization of Acidified Surface Waters

by Charles T. Driscoll, Asst. Prof., Dept. of Civ. Engrg.; Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, N.Y. 13210,
Jeffrey R. White, Grad. Research Asst., Dept. of Civil Engrg.; Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, N.Y. 13210,
Gary C. Schafran, Grad. Research Asst., Dept. of Civ. Engrg.; Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, N.Y. 13210,
John D. Rendall, Grad. Research Asst., Dept. of Civil Engrg.; Syracuse University, Syracuse, N.Y. 13210,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 6, Pg. 1128-1145


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Calcium carbonate was utilized to neutralize an acidic lake and stream in the Adirondack Region of New York state. Theoretical calculations based on aqueous base neutralizing capacity underestimated the CaCO3 dose required to achieve lake neutralization (pH 6.5) for a year. It would appear that lake sediments have a profound influence on base dose requirements. Calcium carbonate neutralization altered water column pH, calcium, acid neutralizing capacity, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, free fluoride, aluminum, manganese, zinc, and copper levels. Chemical equilibrium models appear to be a useful tool in predicting changes in aqueous aluminum chemistry. While calcium carbonate appears to be an effective means of accomplishing lake neutralization, there are potentially deleterious consequences associated with its use.

Subject Headings: Calcium carbonate | Surface water | Lakes | Carbon compounds | pH | Dissolved solids | Acids | Sediment | Rivers and streams | North America | United States | New York

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