Ozone and Weather Patterns in Japan and the U.S.

by Richard A. Wadden, Prof.; Univ. of Illinois, School of Public Health, P.O. Box 6998, Chicago, Ill. 60680,
Yasushi Ogawa, Sr. Environmental Sci.; Air Environment Div., National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-21, Japan,
Michio Okuda, Former Div. Head; Air Environment Division, National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-21, Japan,
Kentaro Murano, Environmental Scientist; Air Environment Div., National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-21, Japan,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 4, Pg. 680-687


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Air pollution and meteorological data were collected in April-June, 1979 for 49 consecutive days in the Tsukuba area about 60 km northeast of Tokyo. Hourly O3, total oxidant, CO, NO and NO2 were collected and the ozone-forming potential, a simple characterization of chemical reactivity, was measured on a regular basis. In addition, 5 ½ months (April-September, 1976) of hourly pollution and meteorological data for 4 stations in the immediate Tokyo area were evaluated with respect to synoptic weather patterns. Ozone levels were strongly correlated with temperature (r = 0.66) but not with NO, NO2, CO, UV radiation, wind speed or direction. Analysis on the basis of synoptic weather patterns revealed maximum values of maximum hourly NO2, ozone-forming potential, ozone and oxidant occurring 3, 3, 4 and 4 days, respectively, after passage of a front. This trend was repeated for NO2 and oxidant for the Tokyo Fujimi station in 1976 and has also been observed in the U.S. The analysis suggests that air mass age is an important factor for ozone development.

Subject Headings: Ozone | Air pollution | Weather forecasting | Ultraviolet radiation | Data collection | Japan | Asia | Tokyo | North America | Colorado | United States

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