Managing Potomac Water Quality: Evolving Approaches

by Austan S. Librach, Dir.; Metropolitan Washington Council of Government's, Dept. of Environmental Programs, 1875 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20006,
Cameron Wiegand, Chf.; Metropolitan Washington Council of Government's, Water Programs, Dept. of Environmental Programs, 1875 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20006,
Stuart Freudberg, Water Resources Engr.; Metropolitan Washington Council of Government's, Dept. of Environmental Programs, 1875 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20006,
Michael Sullivan, Water Resources Engr.; Metropolitan Washington Council of Government's, Dept. of Environmental Programs, 1875 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20006,
Robert N. Magill, Environmental Planner; Metropolitan Washington Council of Government's, Dept. of Environmental Programs, 1875 Eye St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20006,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 3, Pg. 562-577


Document Type: Journal Paper

Errata: (See full record)

Abstract: While an ambitious point source control program has yielded measurable improvements in water quality of the Upper Potomac River Estuary, the degree to which additionally strict point source controls are needed is the subject of current investigations by Washington, D.C. metropolitan area local jurisdictions. Indications are strong that eutrophication trends and periodic events of low dissolved oxygen will continue in the Estuary despite public expenditures for advanced wastewater treatment. Contributing to poor water quality conditions are significant uncontrolled loadings of oxygen demanding material and nutrients estimated to come from natural sources, unregulated agricultural activities, urban stormwater and other nonpoint pollution sources generated locally and upstream of the Washington region. Area jurisdictions are beginning to reappraise the region's water quality control program with the intent of developing a more comprehensive program that considers pollutant loadings from all sources. Investigations will involve an assessment of the costs of achieving desired water quality levels, and a study of possible mixes of point source, nonpoint source and combined sewer overflow controls. Studies will involve use of refined prediction models of the Estuary which employ new information on the magnitude and fluctuation of pollution loadings.

Subject Headings: Water quality | Quality control | Load factors | Water pollution | Estuaries | Nonpoint pollution | Rivers and streams | Jurisdiction | Washington | North America | United States | Potomac River

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