Total Suspended Solids in Highway Runoff in Washington State

by Randy Asplund, Water Systems Engr.; RH2 Engrg., Seattle, Wash. 98195,
Brian W. Mar, (M.ASCE), Prof.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Univ. of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195,
John F. Ferguson, (M.ASCE), Prof.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Univ. of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1982, Vol. 108, Issue 2, Pg. 391-404


Document Type: Journal Paper

Errata: (See full record)

Abstract: During the first year of full-time operation of ten highway runoff monitoring sites in the State of Washington, a total of 241 storms were sampled with a composite sampling system developed by Clark. Vehicle traffic during the storm was found to be the principal factor influencing the mass of suspended solids in the runoff. During winter ice conditions a major fraction of solids loadings in runoff can be traced to sand used. A predictive model for total suspended solids loadings was derived as a function of cumulative traffic during storms. Traffic during the dry periods appeared to remove pollutants from the highways and is not significant in predicting pollutant loadings in the State of Washington.

Subject Headings: Runoff | Solid mechanics | Turbidity | Highways and roads | Storms | Suspended loads | Ice loads | Traffic management | Traffic models | Washington | North America | United States

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