California's Food Industry: Wastewater Management Challenge

by Ronald A. Tsugita, (M.ASCE), Vice-Pres.; James M. Montgomery Consulting Engrs., Inc., Walnut Creek, Calif.,
Christine A. Kahr, (A.M.ASCE), Supervising Engr.; James M. Montgomery Consulting Engrs., Inc., Walnut Creek, Calif.,
Robert H. Ellis, (A.M.ASCE), Supervising Engr.; James M. Montgomery Consulting Engrs., Inc., Walnut Creek, Calif.,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1977, Vol. 47, Issue 9, Pg. 62-68


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: The demand for food products throughout the United States and the world has been partially responsible for the continuous growth of agriculture and food processing in California. This continued increase combined with recent stringent environmental requirements, has resulted in the need for innovative and cost-effective methods for managing the unique wastes generated by the food industry. The general types of control systems, their advantages and disadvantages are considered. These are discharge to municipal treatment plants; separate industrial waste treatment through physical/chemical and biological processes or through land application; in-plant controls. A variety of wastewater management systems and combinations of systems available to the food processing industry are also reported.

Subject Headings: Agricultural wastes | California | Food | Industrial wastes | Wastewater management | Water treatment

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