Efficiency of Refuse Collection Crews

by Jimmie E. Quon, (M.ASCE), Prof.; Envir. Health Engrg., The Technological Inst., Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL,
Robert R. Martens, Design Engr.; Nussbaumer and Clark, Inc., Buffalo, NY; formerly, Grad. Student, Envir. Health Engrg., The Technological Inst., Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL,
Masaru Tanaka, Grad. Student; Envir. Health Engrg., The Technological Inst., Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL,


Serial Information: Journal of the Sanitary Engineering Division, 1970, Vol. 96, Issue 2, Pg. 437-453


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships, if any, between the efficiency of the collection and haul operations and various modes of operation, characteristics of the service area, and characteristics of the equipment used. Data used in the study were from three wards in the City of Chicago for the period of February 1968. The incremental increase in cost of service was $1.43 per ton for the first load and $3.56 per ton for the second load as the age of the trucks increased to the maximum of 8 yr. The cost also increased form $5.59 per ton for the first load to $8.32 per ton for the second load, using trucks of a given age. Cost of service measured in dollars per living unit per week was $0.364 for all age trucks on the first load of the day, while cost for the second load of the day ranged from $0.440 to $0.475 per living unit per week as the age of the truck increased. The average loading speed decreased from 1,200 to 1,120 lb per man-hr on the first load and from 1,120 to 1,000 lb per man-hr on the second load as truck age increased.

Subject Headings: Load factors | Vehicle loads | Trucks | Service loads | Maximum loads | Equipment and machinery | Urban areas | North America | Illinois | United States | Chicago

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