Irrigation in India: Past and Present

by Asit K. Biswas,


Serial Information: Journal of the Irrigation and Drainage Division, 1965, Vol. 91, Issue 1, Pg. 179-192


Document Type: Journal Paper

Discussion: (See full record)
Closure: (See full record)

Abstract: Practice of irrigation in India can be traced to prehistoric times. Water from wells, tanks, and canals was used intensively for irrigation practices. India has immense resources in terms of land and water, but until 1960-1961 only 9% of total annual surface water flow available had been tapped for irrigation. Out of nearly 467,000,000 acres of arable area available, only 70,000,000 acres were irrigated during 1960-1961. Today (1964) food production is India's most important problem and, consequently, irrigation plays an important part in the national economy and welfare. Hence, top priority was given to irrigation and power in the First Five-Year Plan 1951-1956.

Subject Headings: Irrigation | Developing countries | Water tanks | Water resources | Water flow | Surface water | Canals | Wells (water) | India | Asia

Services: Buy this book/Buy this article

 

Return to search