Wetlands' Use for Water Management in Florida

by Douglas C. Ammon, Staff Engr.; EPA, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268,
James P. Heaney, (A.M.ASCE), Prof.; Dept. of Environmental Engrg. Sciences, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, Florida,
Wayne C. Huber, (A.M.ASCE), Prof.; Dept. of Environmental Engrg. Sciences, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 32611,


Serial Information: Journal of the Water Resources Planning and Management Division, 1981, Vol. 107, Issue 2, Pg. 315-327


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: The 2,300 square mile (6,000 km²) Kissimmee River Basin in Central Florida is under pressure for rapid expansion due to urban encroachment and agricultural activities. The river contributes the major portion of surface inflow and a substantial portion of the nutrient loads to Lake Okeechobee, the primary water supply source for South Florida. A basin-wide water management scheme has been proposed based on detention of runoff, restrictions of surface water discharge rates, and routing flow through natural or manmade marshes. The ability of these marshes to serve as quantity and quality control areas is evaluated, and specific questions are addressed concerning trade-offs among drainage, flood control, water supply, and water quality enhancement.

Subject Headings: Wetlands (fresh water) | Water management | Water quality | Water supply | Quality control | Surface water | Basins | Agriculture | Urban development | Rivers and streams | North America | Florida | United States

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