Phosphorus Recycling in Five Shallow Lakes

by Heinz G. Stefan, (M.ASCE), Prof.; Dept. of Civ. and Mineral Engrg., St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Lab., Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55414,
Mark J. Hanson, Research Asst.; St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Lab., Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 55414,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1981, Vol. 107, Issue 4, Pg. 713-730


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Phosphorus recycled from lake sediments is a most important nutrient source for midsummer algae blooms in very shallow northcentral lakes with depths from 2 to 7 meters. A study of the Fairmont Lakes in southern Minnesota conducted over a period of several years has produced extensive data on phosphorus budgets and time-series measurements of phosphorus concentrations which infer or prove that extensive release of phosphorus from the sediments occurs in midsummer. The in-situ evidence presented herein includes measurements of: (1) Phosphorus content in a major storm runoff event; (2) phosphorus depletion after spring snowmelt runoff; (3) phosphorus content in midsummer runoff compared to lake phosphorus content; (4) midsummer phosphorus stratification in the lake; and (5) relationship between temperature stratification and phosphorus stratification dynamics.

Subject Headings: Phosphorus | Recycling | Lakes | Shallow water | Sediment | Water stratification | Runoff | Temperature measurement | Nutrients | North America | Minnesota | United States

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