Behavior of Frozen Clay under Cyclic Axial Loading

by Ted S. Vinson, (A.M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof. of Civ. Engrg.; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, Oreg.,
Ronald L. Czajkowski, Staff Engr.; Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Houston, Tex.; formerly, Research Asst., Div. of Engrg. Research, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Mich.,
Thira Chaichanavong, Instr.; Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok, Thailand; formerly, Research Asst., Div. of Engrg. Research, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Mich.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Geotechnical Engineering Division, 1978, Vol. 104, Issue 7, Pg. 779-800


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Dynamic Young's modulus and damping ratio were determined for axial strain amplitudes from 3 x 10-³% to 10-¹%, temperatures from 30.2°F to 14°F (-1°C to -10°C), frequencies from 0.05 cps to 5 cps, and confining pressures from 0 psi to 200 psi (kN/m² to 1,380 kN/m²). For samples of the frozen Ontonagon clay of value of dynamic Young's modulus over the range of test conditions was from 50 x 10³psi to 870 x 10³psi (3.45 x 10³ to kN/m² to 6,000 x 10³ kN/m²); the value of damping ratio was from 0.02 to 0.3. The test results indicate that the dynamic Young's modulus of frozen clay decreases with increasing strain amplitude and specific surface area; it increases with descending temperature and increasing water content and frequency. The damping ratio increases with increasing strain amplitude and ascending temperature and decreases, in general, with increasing frequency. There appears to be no well-defined relationship between the damping ratio and the specific surface area or water content. Dynamic Young's modulus and damping ratio are apparently not affected by confining pressure.

Subject Headings: Dynamic modulus | Frozen soils | Damping | Elasticity | Soil dynamics | Soil modulus | Temperature effects | Clays

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