Long-Span Buried Structure Design and Construction

by Ernest T. Selig, (M.ASCE), Prof. of Civ. Engrg.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., State Univ. of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y.,
William E. Falby, (A.M.ASCE), Asst. Prof.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., State Univ. of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y.,
Fred H. Kulhawy, (M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof.; School of Environmental and Civ. Engrg., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y.,
John F. Abel, (M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof.; School of Environmental and Civ. Engrg., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Geotechnical Engineering Division, 1978, Vol. 104, Issue 7, Pg. 953-966


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Long-span corrugated-metal buried structures are generally defined as conduits constructed of structural plate with spans exceeding 15 ft to 25 ft (4.6 m to 7.6 m) or radii of curvature exceeding 8 ft to 12 ft (2.4 m to 3.7 m). The principal applications for long-span structures are culverts and grade separations, with many installations serving as alternatives for small bridges. The paper summarizes a comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art of the design and construction of these long-span structures. Among the aspects considered for these conduits are the design concepts, construction procedures, economic considerations, experimental investigations, and failures. Conditions imposed during construction of the long-span structures are major factors governing design. The use of proper construction procedures is vital. Most of the long-span structure failures, which have occurred either during construction or in service, have resulted from improper construction or backfill material.

Subject Headings: Construction management | Bridge design | Construction materials | Underground structures | Conduits | Forensic engineering | Failure analysis | Material failures

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