Laboratory Scale Composting: Studies

by C. Stuart Clark, Research Asst.; Dept. of Chemical Engrg., Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario, Canada,
Reginald H. Clark, Prof.; Dept. of Chemical Engrg., Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario, Canada,
Ronald Charbonneau, Microbiologist; Dominion Mushroom Farm, Locust Hill, Ontario, Canada,
Charles O. Buckingham, Technical Officer; Huron Chemical Co. Ltd., Kingston, Ontario, Canada,


Serial Information: Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division, 1978, Vol. 104, Issue 1, Pg. 47-59


Document Type: Journal Paper

Discussion: Regan Raymond W. (See full record)

Abstract: The effects of temperature, inoculum type, and mineral concentrations on the laboratory scale composting of a synthetic solid waste have been investigated. The composting activity of the synthetic solid waste shows two distinct phases of respiratory activity. The first phase appears due to a thermophilic bacteria which shows maximum activity at approximately 55°C while the second phase appears due to a mesophilic microorganism which shows maximum activity at approximately 40°C. The type of inoculum used has a marked effect on the relationship between these two phases. This effect is primarily attributable to the mineral components, apparently calcium and phosphorus, in the soil inocula. Supplementation of the synthetic solid waste with minerals, in the form of soluble salts has a dramatic effect on the respiratory activity of the compost suggesting that minerals may be limiting in other composting situations as well.

Subject Headings: Composting | Minerals | Solid mechanics | Solid wastes | Mine wastes | Laboratory tests | Temperature effects | Bacteria

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