A Theory of Creep Failure in Overconsolidated Clay

by John D. Nelson, (M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, Colo.,
Erik G. Thompson, Prof.; Dept. of Civ. Engrg., Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, Colo.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Geotechnical Engineering Division, 1977, Vol. 103, Issue 11, Pg. 1281-1294


Document Type: Journal Paper

Discussion: Fragaszy Richard J. (See full record)
Discussion: Leroueil Serge (See full record)

Abstract: A theory of creep failure is set forth that explains the interaction between the phenomena of creep, strain softening, and time dependent failures in overconsolidated clay. The theory is based on the hypothesis that time dependent, irreversible strains (creep) have some detrimental effect on the soil's internal bonds as do the plastic strains ccurring during the strain softening stage of a triaxial test. The theory is considered with reference to laboratory tests and observed field behavior reported in the literature. An example is presented to demonstrate application of the theory in predicting the lifetime of a slope in overconsolidated clay.

Subject Headings: Creep | Strain hardening and softening | Failure analysis | Overconsolidated soils | Clays | Time dependence | Soft soils

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