Use of Space in Highway Impact Zone

by Floyd I. Thiel, Chf.; Transportation Economics Div., Office of Program and Policy Planning, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.,
Jo Ann Fields, Economist; Transportation Economics Div., Office of Program and Policy Planning, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.,
Roger D. Mingo, Program Analyst; Socio-Economic Studies Div., Office of Program and Policy Planning, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, D.C.,


Serial Information: Transportation Engineering Journal of ASCE, 1976, Vol. 102, Issue 4, Pg. 727-736


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: Recently, the harmful effects of freeway promixity have been given much attention, and the knowledge gained has been helpful in evaluating alternative courses of action to minimize these effects. But activities that may be benefited or unaffected by highway proximity also need to be identified. There is a need to learn more about the relationship between various land uses and limited access highways and also to examine the extent to which what has been thought to be so is borne out by experience. For example, commercial and industrial activities appear to be generally suited for highway locations. School, church, hospital, and multifamily residential experience seems mixed; some of these activities apparently adjust to or benefit from highway locations and some may not. This paper suggests that the adverse effects some activities experience in highway impact areas can be largely avoided if priority is given to assuring appropriate uses in these zones.

Subject Headings: Highways and roads | Land use | Industries | School (K-12) | Religious buildings | Health care facilities | Residential location

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