Fate of Wastewater Phosphorus in Soil

by Carl G. Enfield, Civ. Engr.; Water Quality Control Branch, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, Okla.,
Bert E. Bledsoe, Chemist; Water Quality Control Branch, Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ada, Okla.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Irrigation and Drainage Division, 1975, Vol. 101, Issue 3, Pg. 145-155


Document Type: Journal Paper

Abstract: The fate of wastewater orthophosphate applied to the land is controlled primarily by two mechanisms. First, phosphorus is sorbed by the soil with the formation of relatively weak bonds and then the phosphorus combines with elements commonly found in the soil to form relatively insoluble compounds. The previous mechanisms are examined showing how they control the phosphorus concentration in the soil solution. In addition, kinetic theories are applied to experimental phosphorus sorption data. Using these kinetic theories, when combined with a mass balance equation, it is possible to project the time and space phosphorus concentration in a soil system.

Subject Headings: Phosphorus | Wastewater management | Kinetics | Bonding | Sorption

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