Salinity Control and Federal Water Quality Act

by Michael B. Bessler, General Engr.; Water Quality Office, Div. of Planning Coordination, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colo.,
John T. Maletic, Chf.; Water Quality Office, Div. of Planning Coordination, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colo.,


Serial Information: Journal of the Hydraulics Division, 1975, Vol. 101, Issue 5, Pg. 581-594


Document Type: Journal Paper

Discussion: Pillsbury Arthur F. (See full record)
Closure: (See full record)

Abstract: Salinity as a mineral pollutant is receiving increased attention in the Western United States in terms of economic impacts. The salinity control problem on the Colorado River is examined in relation to the Federal Water Quality Act, PL 92-500. As such, it is concluded that even basinwide, salinity controls as presently envisioned will not be able to meet anticipated salinity standards and the zero discharge goals of the Act. A new planning strategy of total water management is suggested to identify and evaluate water needs, water resources, physical technology, management technology, and other nonphysical constraints. Thus, the specific economic limitations and institutional constraints identified under the various management options will assist in setting attainable salinity levels within a river basin in lieu of meeting rigid zero discharge limitations for each water user. It is concluded that some institutional changes or modifications should be anticipated if the best practical control technology and total water management techniques are to be applied.

Subject Headings: Salt water | Water quality | Quality control | Federal government | Salinity | Water resources | Economic factors | Basins | Rivers and streams | North America | Colorado River | United States

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